A Sustainable Gift From Me To You …

Standard

A Sustainable Gift From Me To You …

By Rowena Mynott

 

If you are anything like me at the end of the year you are feeling a little drained and exhausted. On top of that you have to contend with doing battle in the shops and if you are in any way, shape or form looking for an environmentally friendly product, rummaging through piles of plastic or plastic wrapped gifts can be disheartening. So, I am going to try and make it easier for ONE person (I’d love to treat you all but it’s just not possibly I’m afraid!) and give away a fantastic sustainable gift pack. It includes:

  • Glass Dharma straw
  • A hemp carrying pouch for the straw (so you can throw it in your bag and not worry about breakages)
  • A bamboo toothbrush
  • A copy of Bag It the movie
  • A lovely pewter dolphin keyring crafted by Roland St John (to remind you of why you are living sustainably)

photo copy 3

 

 

These glass straws are fantastic products, I use mine for both hot and cold drinks, they are easy to clean and easy to carry around in the little pouch. The bamboo toothbrush is made entirely from sustainable and biodegradable bamboo (it’s even panda friendly!) If you haven’t seen the movie Bag It you really need to. If you are hoping to give this as a gift to encourage someone to live more sustainably then this movie might be the eye opener they really need. It’s a stunning example of why we need to reduce the amount of plastics we use. Finally, the beautiful little dolphin can be attached to keys or a bag for a daily reminder of the ocean.

 

 

giveaway 2013 b

 

So, how do you win? Simple. Follow these simple steps and in a weeks time I will announce the winner.

1) Sign up to the 72&Rising Newsletter

2) Like 72&Rising on Facebook

3) Optional extra for bonus points – tell me in the comments below who you are wanting the gift for and why

4) Optional extra for bonus points – share this post with your friends

 

Good luck – feel free to share this far and wide. Plastic pollution is an issue that effects us all. Lets see if we can do our bit to reduce it

The fine print …

  1. Unfortunately I can’t guarantee delivery for Christmas 
  2. This offer is open for Australian residents only
  3. You must complete the required steps to be in the running
  4. Winner will be picked at random on December 22nd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

‘How to’ Guide to Make Recycled Toilet Roll Cars

Standard

IMG_0686

By Rowena Mynott

I posted recently about my son’s third birthday party and how I had tried to make it as sustainable as possible by avoiding wasteful plastic items.

These little recycled toilet roll cars that I had made to give away as party favours received lots of attention.  Being recycled they are dirt cheap, sustainable, and fun for the kids to get involved with.  You can be as simple or creative as you like – let you imagination run wild!

I made a little video to show you the step by steps I took to create these cars, but here are the written instructions in case you are more of a text person.

 

What do you need?

  • Toilet roll inserts or paper towel inserts
  • Paint. I used water based paint but you could use anything.
  • Paintbrushes
  • Scissors
  • Black marker pens
  • Stickers to decorate your car with
  • Spare cardboard or black paper
  • Brads (small tacks with 2 pins on the back that can be separated to hold paper in place)

Additional supplies for alternative decorations:

  • Glue
  • Coloured/patterned paper

 

How do you do it?

Step 1:

Once you have collected all your toilet rolls give them a coat of paint. I used bright water soluble paint as I had Mr 3 helping me out, but you could use any sort of paint or even coloured or patterned paper.

I gave the cars two coats of paint, allowing it to dry in-between obviously.

Note: It’s ideal if you can avoid getting paint in the inside of the car.  You will see in the video that it ends up looking quite messy. Alternatively you could just paint the inside too! Or why not add a circle of cardboard to hide the inside and draw a grill on it with black marker pen?

 

Step 2:

Mark out a rectangle on top of the car. It needs to be slightly wider at one end than the other but it can be as long or as short as you like.

Cut out carefully along both longer sides and the wider end. A craft knife would be ideal but scissors work too.

Bend the flap back carefully to crease the narrow end and fold the flap in half tucking the wide end into the narrower side of the hole to secure it.

 

Step 3:

Take your cardboard or black paper and trace around the end of the toilet roll four times to make the wheels. Cut these out.

Using a pair of scissors carefully put a hole in the centre of the wheels.

Find the correct position on the car and put a hole where you would like the wheels to go.

Take a brad and insert through each wheel and into the car. Bend the forks in opposite directions on the inside

 

Step 4:

Decorate your car however you like. Use stickers or marker pen, pom poms or magazine cut outs.

 

Step 5:

Have hours of fun watching a child play with their new toy.

 

You could create so many variations, not just in car designs. How about making a bus or a lorry? People or animals?

What have you created from recycled materials?

Plastic Free July – Will YOU take up the challenge? We have!

Standard

plastic-free-july-logo-banner-sml

 “Think about it, why would you make something that you’re going to use for a few minutes out of a material that’s basically going to last forever, and you’re just going to throw it away. What’s up with that?

– Jeb Berrier (Bag It movie).

 

Initiated by Western Metropolitan Regional Council and developed by Earth Carers staff, Plastic Free July has been running since 2011.  The challenge, as the name suggests is quite simple: To attempt to consume no single-use plastic during July. Single use plastics include things such as plastic shopping bags, straws and plastic packaging.  Impacts from plastic severely impact upon our oceans and waterways.  Australians contribute 1 million tonnes of plastic to landfills every year.

5821623652_2189fafe62

Taken from 5Gyres website

A plastic filled beach in Hawaii

 

 

Here are some facts taken from the Plastic Free July website that may make you think more seriously the next time you reach for that plastic bag:

  • Every piece of plastic ever produced still remains in the earth today! (Take one minute to think about that!)
  • From 1960-2000 over 1 billion tonnes of plastic was produced.  This figure has already doubled in the last 10 years
  • Worldwide in one week we use 10 billion plastic bags
  • In the USA an average of 2.5 million plastic bottles are used every hour
  • In the USA over 500 million plastic straws are used daily
  • In 2013 the UN and WHO reported that evidence linking hormone-mimicking chemicals to human health problems has grown stronger over the past decade, becoming a “global threat” that should be addressed
  • 80% of the oceans debris has come from the land
  • More than 270 of the worlds marine animal species are affected by marine debris
  • 5 of the top 10 marine debris items are associated with beverages
  • CSIROs national coastal debris survey estimates that there are 115,513,626 pieces of rubbish on Australia’s coastline.  This averages at 5.2 pieces for every person in the country.
  • 74% of all waste found is plastic

 

5830879650_7325e029ed

Taken from 5Gyres website

 

This challenge whilst serious in nature is not a competition so why not sign up and give it your best shot? Your contribution no matter how big or small WILL make a difference.

The 72&Rising shop will be opening in July so if you are looking for some sustainable items (free even from plastic packaging) to replace some of those plastic ones, please head to the store on our website www.72andrising.com

Let us know in the comments or our Facebook page if you decide to take up the challenge. We have!

Good Luck!